Expressionism

Painting:

The Scream – Edvard Munch

A form of Expressionism I particularly like is German woodcut. I don’t know why, I just like the patterns and the overall style of it. This technique originated in China and used for printing on clothes and other things. The technique was then adopted by expressionists. Their starkly simplified woodcuts capitalized on the medium’s potential for bold, flat patterns and rough hewn effects. (http://www.moma.org/explore/collection/ge/techniques/woodcut).

The image below is one of my favorites, Kristus by Karl Schmidt-Rottluff.

I first came across the woodcut style in Y11 art when we had to do self portraits in this style. Below are some examples of my work. The top piece is copies of existing artwork, the bottom are three different self portraits in German woodcut expressionism. (These were just done in black felt tip though). The far right are some prints out of lino tiles, carved out and stamped.

WP_20140415_003

Another famous expressionist artist if Jackson Pollock.  He splattered and dripped paint onto canvases. I think his type of work represents rage, or anger because of the boldness and tone of his work. Also his technique is also quite an aggressive one, which comes through in his paintings.

I have looked at his art before, when I was doing research for a visual communication project. The image below is my attempt at expressionist art with Jackson Pollock as inspiration.

Rage

 

Persistence of memory – Dali

Surrealism is fairly similar to expressionism. Dali is one of the well known surrealists. His paintings look like they come right out of a dream or nightmare he had.

Dance:

Triadic Ballet is as weird as it gets. You can easily tell though that it is expressionist and Avant Garde.

Architecture:

Tatlins tower would have been an Expressionist piece of architecture, but it was never built. It would have been 400m tall and made from iron, glass and steel.People would have been transported it in a lift that goes round the double helix part of the tower.

As you can see, The Orbit built in London for the 2012 Olympics takes inspiration from the Tatlin tower.

Film:

Expressionist films are usually in black and white and come across as eerie and take part on absurd, non realistic sets and weird costumes, due to the low budget and also just the style of the films.

A famous example is Nosferatu.

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